American Flag and Flag Day

On June 14, 1777, the Continental Congress passed an act establishing an official flag for the new nation. The resolution stated: “Resolved, that the flag of the United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation." On Aug. 3, 1949, President Harry S. Truman officially declared June 14 as Flag Day.

The history of our flag is as fascinating as that of the American Republic itself. It has survived battles, inspired songs and evolved in response to the growth of the country it represents. 

  • Flag Day occurs on June 14th every year, but it is not an official federal holiday.
    Even though it is not a federal holiday, many cities and towns hold festivals and parades to honor the American Flag.
  • Flag Day was originally the celebration of the adoption of United States Flag.
    In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson is recorded as officially setting June 14, as Flag Day. Even with Wilson’s act, on a federal level the holiday was not passed by Congress.
  • Flag Day honors the American Flag and all its traditions. Historically, the story that Betsy Ross created the first flag has been passed down through the generations. However, it is actually believed that a United States Congressman named Francis Hopkinson created the first flag.
    The design of the American Flag was not made official until 1912. At that time, a governmental order adopted the current design.
  • The nickname for the American Flag is the “Stars and Stripes.”
  • The thirteen stripes on the flag represent the thirteen original colonies and the colors of the stripes, red and white, stand for the courage and purity of our nation. The stars stand for the fifty separate but united States of our nation.
  • Over the past years the flag has changed 27 times. The last change was on July 4, 1960 to include the 50th state, Hawaii.
  • There are many customs and traditions surrounding the American Flag. Flag Day is a day set aside to teach and remember the history and these customs and traditions.

VOTE! 2012

Today is Election Day! Since 1792 we have been electing our Presidents for the United States of America. Many people will have different feelings about this election... At the end of the day, we are all American's and must work together towards the greater good.  Please exercise your right to vote and cast your ballot for who you believe will do the better job.

American Heritage Merit Badge requirement 3 would be great to work on during this Election.

If doing flags as a Troop fundraiser, don't forget to put them out this morning!

The Fourth of July!


We hope that you have a Happy and Safe Independence Day. Our thoughts and prayers go out to all those in the Armed Forces who are fighting and protecting our freedom, and to those that are being affected and those who are fighting against all the wild fires Nation wide.   



This day is to commemorate the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4th, 1776.  American's have many customs and celebrations for this day.  The most common is lighting of fireworks (a scouts favorite... be careful and always have adult supervision), BBQ's, Parades, and Picnics.  Everyone has different ways that they celebrated... but we are all celebrating the same thing... our freedom.  John Adams wrote this of Independence day to his wife Abigail, "This day in July, 1776, will be the most memorable epoch in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival. It ought to be commemorated as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations, from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward forever more."




American Heritage Merit Badge - Requirement 1
Read the Declaration of Independence. Pay close attention to the section that begins with “We hold these truths to be self-evident” and ends with “to provide new Guards for their future security.” Rewrite that section in your own words, making it as easy to understand as possible. Then, share your writing with your merit badge counselor and discuss the importance of the Declaration to all Americans.



We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. — That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, — That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.

American Heritage Merit Badge

  1. Read the Declaration of Independence. Pay close attention to the section that begins with “We hold these truths to be self-evident” and ends with “to provide new Guards for their future security.” Rewrite that section in your own words, making it as easy to understand as possible. Then, share your writing with your merit badge counselor and discuss the importance of the Declaration to all Americans.

  2. Do TWO of the following:

    • Select two individuals from American history, one a political leader (a president, senator, etc.) and the other a private citizen (a writer, religious leader, etc.). Find out about each person's accomplishments and compare the contributions each has made to America's heritage.

    • With your counselor's approval, choose an organization that has promoted some type of positive change in American society. Find out why the organization believed this change was necessary and how it helped to accomplish the change. Discuss how this organization is related to events or situations from America's past.

    • With your counselor's approval, interview two veterans of the U.S. military. Find out what their experiences were like. Ask the veterans what they believe they accomplished.

    • With your counselor's approval, interview three people in your community of different ages and occupations. Ask these people what America means to them, what they think is special about this country, and what American traditions they feel are important to preserve.

  3. Do the following:

    • Select a topic that is currently in the news. Describe to your counselor what is happening. Explain how today's events are related to or affected by the events and values of America's past.

    • For each of the following, describe its adoption, tell about any changes since its adoption, and explain how each one continues to influence Americans today: the flag, the Pledge of Allegiance, the seal, the motto, and the national anthem.

    • Research your family's history. Find out how various events and situations in American history affected your family. Share what you find with your counselor. Tell why your family came to America.

  4. Do TWO of the following:

    • Explain what is meant by the National Register of Historic Places. Describe how a property becomes eligible for listing. Make a map of your local area, marking the points of historical interest. Tell about any National Register properties in your area. Share the map with your counselor, and describe the historical points you have indicated.

    • Research an event of historical importance that took place in or near your area. If possible, visit the place. Tell your counselor about the event and how it affected local history. Describe how the area looked then and what it now looks like.

    • Find out when, why, and how your town or neighborhood started, and what ethnic, national, or racial groups played a part. Find out how the area has changed over the past 50 years and try to explain why.

    • Take an active part in a program about an event or person in American history. Report to your counselor about the program, the part you took, and the subject.

    • Visit a historic trail or walk in your area. After your visit, share with your counselor what you have learned. Discuss the importance of this location and explain why you think it might qualify for National Register listing.

  5. Do ONE of the following:

    • Watch two motion pictures (with the approval and permission of your counselor and parent) that are set in some period of American history. Describe to your counselor how accurate each film is with regard to the historical events depicted and also with regard to the way the characters are portrayed.

    • Read a biography (with your counselor's approval) of someone who has made a contribution to America's heritage. Tell some things you admire about this individual and some things you do not admire. Explain why you think this person has made a positive or a negative contribution to America's heritage.

    • Listen to recordings of popular songs from various periods of American history. Share five of these songs with your counselor, and describe how each song reflects the way people felt about the period in which it was popular. If a recording is not available, have a copy of the lyrics available.

  6. Discuss with your counselor the career opportunities in American heritage. Pick one that interests you and explain how to prepare for this career. Discuss what education and training are required for this career.