Types of Boats

One of my favorite things to do is canoeing.  Slicing the still lake water with the paddle and gliding on the lake... ahh, so relaxing. But, there is more to boats than just a canoe.   If you did a search on Wikipedia, you would have a list of over 180 different types of boats!  For requirement 1 of the Tiger Adventure, Floats and Boats, we are going to keep it simple with just 5 different types of boats.

Rowboat

Rowing is the act of propelling a boat using the motion of oars in the water, displacing water, and propelling the boat forward. The difference between paddling and rowing is that rowing requires oars to have a mechanical connection with the boat, while paddles are hand-held and have no mechanical connection.

Canoe

A canoe is a lightweight narrow boat, typically pointed at both ends and open on top, propelled by one or more seated or kneeling paddlers facing the direction of travel using a single-bladed paddle

Kayak

A kayak is a small, narrow watercraft which is propelled by means of a double-bladed paddle. The word kayak originates from the Greenlandic language, where it is the word qajaq (pronounced [qajaq]). In the UK the term canoe is often used when referring to a kayak.

Sailboat

A sailboat or sailing boat is a boat propelled partly or entirely by sails smaller than a sailing ship. Distinctions in what constitutes a sailing boat and ship vary by region and maritime culture.

Motorboat

A motorboat, speedboat, or powerboat is a boat which is powered by an engine. Some motorboats are fitted with inboard engines, others have an outboard motor installed on the rear, containing the internal combustion engine, the gearbox and the propeller in one portable unit.